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Aspirin Dos and Don’ts

An aspirin a day keeps the stroke away.

One thing aspirin does is interrupt the process that makes your blood clot. Taking one every day helps keep your blood flowing smoothly and helps prevent blockages in your blood vessels that can lead to strokes and heart attacks. Talk to your doctor about whether it’s a good idea for you.

 

Regular aspirin use may help women avoid Parkinson’s disease.

A study found that women who took at least two aspirin a week had a 40% lower risk of Parkinson’s. Researchers aren’t sure why. Maybe it’s because women tend to take higher doses for arthritis and headaches than men take for heart problems.

 

Aspirin was developed in the 1890s

As far back as 1500 B.C., people were hip to the medicinal powers of the willow bark plant. But it wasn’t until the 1800s that scientists figured out which part of that plant was doing the healing. In 1897, a scientist used a new form of the drug to treat his father’s rheumatism. And the aspirin we know today — acetylsalicylic acid — was born.

 

Don’t’ give a child with the flu aspirin because it can make them sicker.

Aspirin is a no-no for kids who have a fever or a viral infection like the flu. It’s linked to Reye syndrome, a serious condition with symptoms like vomiting, confusion, and being overstimulated. It causes swelling in the brain and liver and may lead to a coma.

Until age 19, you’re usually better off reaching for acetaminophen or ibuprofen, unless your doctor specifically says to use aspirin.

 

50% of North American adults consuming aspirin

The No. 1 reason over half of people ages 45-75 pop these pills is to help prevent a heart attack.

 

It is safe to take aspirins another way besides swallowing it.

Aspirin comes in different forms: tablets, powder, gum — and as a suppository.

It’s probably easiest to take it by mouth, but it affects your body the same, no matter how it gets in there. Follow the directions on the package.

 

Too much aspirin could cause ringing in your ears.

High doses can cause tinnitus. The ringing should go away once you stop taking the medicine.

The most common side effect is a tummy ache. Eat something before you take a dose to help avoid that.

It’s possible to have an allergic reaction to aspirin, but it’s rare.

 

You cannot take aspirin for a headache when you are pregnant.

For moms-to-be acetaminophen is a better choice for pain relief.

But if you’re at high risk for preeclampsia, your doctor will probably recommend a low dose of aspirin to prevent high blood pressure and protein in your urine.

Since aspirin can cause extra bleeding during labor, you shouldn’t take it during the last 6-8 weeks your baby’s on board, unless your doctor told you to.

 

Dissolve aspirin in your water to give it added zing when you working in your garden.

Who knew? Aspirin can be good medicine for plants, too. A solution of one and a half tablets in 2 gallons of water sprayed on your garden every 3 weeks can give you more and bigger veggies. The key ingredient, salicylic acid, bumps up plant growth and helps protect them from disease.

Other reported fixes with aspirin — making a paste for acne or bee stings, protecting your hair from chlorine, boosting your car battery — don’t have the science to back them up.

 

It’s not bad for you to take aspirin after the date on its bottle.

One large study found that most drugs are still OK up to 15 years after they’re made. Manufacturers are required by law to give an expiration date: It’s their suggestion for when you should use the medicine for the best results.

To be safe, check with your doctor or pharmacist before you take any expired medicines.

 

What are Cataracts?

Cataracts are protein deposits that, as they grow larger, cloud the lens of the eye and impair vision.

They can affect one or both eyes. They develop up to twice as frequently in the presence of diabetes.

They also tend to develop at a much younger age and progress more quickly. If you do develop

cataracts, they are typically treated surgically. While diabetic cataracts can be more complicated than

other types, the results are typically quite good. Symptoms to look out for: Blurred, clouded or

worsening vision, sensitivity to light or glare, halos around lights.

Types of cataracts include:

 Age-related cataracts. As the name suggests, this type of cataract develops as a result of

aging.

 Congenital cataracts. Babies are sometimes born with cataracts as a result of an infection,

injury, or poor development before they were born, or they may develop during childhood.

 Secondary cataracts. These develop as a result of other medical conditions, like diabetes, or

exposure to toxic substances, certain drugs (such as corticosteroids or diuretics), ultraviolet light,

or radiation.

 Traumatic cataracts. These form after injury to the eye.

Other factors that can increase a person’s risk of developing cataracts include cigarette smoke,

air pollution, and heavy alcohol consumption

What Are the Symptoms of Cataracts?

Cataracts usually form slowly and cause few symptoms until they noticeably block light. When

symptoms are present, they can include:

 Vision that is cloudy, blurry, foggy, or filmy

 Progressive nearsightedness in older people often called “second sight” because although their

distance vision is deteriorating, they may no longer need reading glasses.

 Changes in the way you see color because the discolored lens acts as a filter.

 Problems driving at night such as glare from oncoming headlights.

 Problems with glare during the day.

 Double vision while looking through the eye with a cataract (like a superimposed image).

 Sudden changes in glasses prescription.

Dealing with Depression

Have you been feeling anxious or blue lately, and you can’t shake that feeling? If

so, you’re not alone. One in five seniors has mental health challenges. It’s a

Canadian health crisis, yet we’re often hesitant to discuss it because there’s still

stigma, or negative stereotypes, around mental illness. Seniors face unique risks

for developing depression. As we age, we may feel increasingly isolated or lack

community support. A change in mental health could also be related to medical

conditions, reduced mobility, physiological changes in the brain, or life events

such as financial strain, the loss of a spouse or moving out of the family home.

People with a family history of mental illness, or who have experienced

depression before, are especially vulnerable. Late-life depression is not a normal

part of aging. Anyone experiencing symptoms such as a persistent depressive

mood, sleeping problems, changes in appetite, difficulties with memory or

concentration, negative thoughts, or thoughts of death and suicide should seek

help immediately. The majority of older adults respond well to treatment.

Seniors can also support their mental health by staying active, such as

participating in activities at their retirement home, exercising regularly and

socializing with friends and family.

Contact White Wings Home Care Services for more information

info@whitewings.ca

www.whitewingshomecare.ca

519-615-7621




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