Tag-Archive for » home care «

The Word “Muscle” Comes From the Latin “Musculus,” Which Means Little Mouse

What percent of your body weight is muscle?

If you’re a lean man, your body is about 45% muscle, 15% bone, and 15% fat. If you’re a woman, you have around 30% muscle, 12% bone, and 30% fat. The other 25% of your weight comes from your organs.

Which muscle(s) in your body works the hardest?

It may not do any heavy lifting, but your heart is a muscle your body uses constantly. From the minute it forms while you’re in the womb until you die, it beats without stopping, helping move blood through your body.

The human body has about how many muscles?

You need muscles for everything you do, from running and lifting to digesting, breathing, and even getting goosebumps! It’s no wonder you have more than 600 of them to keep your body in working order.

It takes more muscles to frown than to smile.
It’s been a rumor for a long time that frowning uses more muscles than smiling. But scientists tested it and put an end to the myth. You use about 11 muscles to frown, and a mere 12 to turn it upside down.

Each of your fingers has ___ muscles in it.
Your fingers are like puppets and your hands are the puppeteers. There’s no muscle on your finger bones — only tendons that hold them to the muscles in your palm and wrist.

Spinach can help give you strong muscles.
Looks like Popeye was really on to something. Spinach is a rich source of iron, which your body needs to carry oxygen through your blood. Without enough of it, your muscles would be too tired to work. Spinach alone won’t make you a champion bodybuilder, but the iron in it is a key player in muscle health.

What is muscle memory?

When inactive muscles quickly regain strength. Scientists found that when you build muscle, it forms new structures, called nuclei, which can make more muscle later on. Even when you stop using these muscles, the nuclei stick around. That gives you a head start when you start training again.

You can body-build in your sleep.
A workout will set the tone for strong muscles, but sleep is when you really get pumped up. Your body strengthens and repairs tissues during your deepest sleep cycles. So get your ZZZs — you need a full night’s rest for optimal muscle mending and growth.

 

Where is the smallest muscle in your body?

It’s called the stapedius, and it’s in your middle ear. It’s connected to the smallest bone in your body, the stapes. This little muscle keeps the stapes from vibrating too much when loud noises hit your ear — including the sound of your own voice.

 

 

CCAC health professionals are on strike Friday morning across Ontario, including London

A strike by nurses who co-ordinate home care has pushed overcrowded Ontario hospitals into uncharted waters that could strand patients in wards and backup emergency rooms, a leading hospital official says.

“We’re kind of entering unknown territory,” Windsor Regional CEO David Musyj said. “Extra minutes turn into extra hours, hours turn into half-days — it starts to add up.”

Windsor is part of the broad sweep of Ontario that may feel the squeeze of a strike that began at midnight Thursday and left nearly 3,000 health-care workers on the picket line at nine of 14 community care access centres (CCAC) across the province.

Such a strike hasn’t occurred since Ontario Liberals began steering money away from hospitals and toward cheaper home care. Hospitals have since used home care as a pressure valve to quickly and safely discharge patients to the community.

But with the strike, that pressure valve may jam shut, and hospital officials won’t know how bad it might be until it happens.

“A week from now, I don’t know,” Musyj said.

Some nurses, social workers and therapists with CCAC are normally stationed weekdays in hospitals and ERs to quickly find home care for those who need it. Hospitals discharge most patients on weekdays and not at night or on weekends. In Windsor, those CCAC staff help discharge 50 patients a day.

But with the strike, there will be no one from CCAC in hospital, leaving hospital staff to fax requests to CCAC offices to a skeletal staff of managers and those not in the nurses’ union.

The London-based agency acknowledges the strike by 450 of its workers may cause delays for people seeking new or expanded home care.

“There may be delays in responding to patients with less urgent needs,” Southwest CCAC spokesperson Andria Appeldoorn wrote in a media release Friday.

A spokesperson for CCACs provincewide went even further, saying the strike robs the agencies of the majority of staff and will cause some delays.

“People will not come on to (home) service as quickly as if we didn’t have a strike,” said Megan Allen-Lamb, who is also CEO of North Simcoe Muskoka CCAC.

Those delays could be made worse because hospital wards and ERs are already filled to the rafters, Musyj said.

In the past seven days at London’s University and Victoria hospitals, there have been more patients than staffed beds planned for each day, with capacity ranging between 102% and 113%, according to the hospitals.

Officials at London Health Science Centre (LHSC) didn’t agree to an interview Friday, instead issuing a short media release.

Carol Young-Ritchie, LHSC vice president, wrote that the CCAC has a plan to minimize disruption to patients.

“We don’t anticipate any changes to ongoing provision of priority services to patients,” she wrote. As to patients who need home care but are not deemed a priority, Young-Ritchie was silent.

Nurses at CCAC, and to a lesser extent social workers and therapists, serve as gatekeepers to those seeking new or expanded home care or a place in a nursing home.

The strike means some calls for help will be fielded by people who aren’t part of a regulated health profession such as nursing — but the CCAC says they will only assist those making decisions about access to care.

“Non-union staff members have been trained to support patient services during this labour disruption,” Appeldoorn wrote.

But though hospitals and the CCAC expect some delays, Ontario Health Minister Eric Hoskins didn’t acknowledge that as even a possibility.

“We understand that the CCACs have developed contingency plans and are working with all of their partners to ensure patients continue to receive the care they need,” he wrote in a media release.

Neither the CCAC nor the Ontario Nurses’ Association (ONA) has publicly disclosed their contract demands, but it’s clear their disagreement is more to do about how pay will be boosted than about how much. Nurses want annual raises of at least 1.4% to keep pace with ONA colleagues in hospitals and nursing homes. The CCAC previously agreed to deals with other unions to pay about that amount but with some coming as lump sums that wouldn’t automatically be applied to future contracts.

Other CCACs on strike Friday were North East, North West, Central East, Central, North Simcoe Muskoka, Waterloo Wellington, South East, and Erie St. Clair. “Your employer has drawn a line in the sand . . . Their actions are wrong, mean-spirited and disrespectful,” ONA President Linda Haslam-Stroud wrote to members.

Both sides accuse the other of walking away from the bargaining table. READ MORE


 

 

Helping More Seniors Get Care They Need at Home

Ontario Improving Access to Home and Community Care in the London Area

Seniors in London and the rest of southwestern Ontario are receiving better access to home care and community supports to help them live independently and at home longer.

Ontario is providing nearly $21 million to support home care for more seniors and for expanded community health care services, including mental health supports, in the South West Local Health Integration Network (LHIN).

This investment will support programs that reduce unnecessary emergency room and hospital readmissions, including:

 

  • Expanding Home First, which helps patients move from hospital to home faster with additional community services.
  • Adding more spaces at day programs that provide seniors and adults with complex needs with personal care services including medication administration, mealtime assistance and blood pressure checks.
  • Increasing overnight caregiver respite support through Behavioural Support Ontario to allow four nights per month at five providers across the LHIN for the families of seniors who are living with dementia or have other behavioural challenges.

 

Improving access to home care and community supports is a key priority of Ontario’s Action Plan for Health Care and helps to provide the right care, at the right time, in the right place. This is part of the Ontario government’s economic plan to invest in people, build modern infrastructure and support a dynamic and innovative business climate.

 

_____________________________________________________________________

Ministry of Health and Long-term Care

Your Health Services

Health care professionals

Need a doctor?

Are you looking for a family doctor or nurse practitioner? Start here to find health care professionals now accepting new patients.

Family

Find health care options

Use this service to explore the different health care choices available to you in your community.

Ontario Health Card

Ontario Health Insurance

Ontario residents can access free emergency and preventive medical care under OHIP, the Ontario Health Insurance Plan.

Hospital operating room

Ontario Wait Times

Want to know how long you can expect to wait in an emergency room, or for surgery or diagnostic imaging? Search here.

Pharmacist holding a pill

Prescription drug benefits

Find out information about the Ontario Drug Benefit Program.

Seniors' Care

Seniors’ Care

If you are a senior, you have many options for care in your home, in supportive housing, in a retirement residence, or in a long-term care home.

In The Spotlight

SEE MORE >

Better Health Care for Ontarians

2012 Agreement for Ontario Doctors

On December 10, 2012, an agreement was reached between the Ontario Medical Association and the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The 2012 Physician Services Agreement protects and builds on the gains made for patients over the last nine years.

Find a Flu Shot Clinic

Find a Flu Shot Clinic

The flu is a serious, acute respiratory illness that can lead to pneumonia. It is caused by a virus. Immunization helps strengthen your body’s natural immune response against the flu. The flu shot stimulates your immune system to build antibodies against the virus, making it stronger and ready to fight off the flu.

Stand Up To Diabetes

Stand Up To Diabetes

If not treated or properly managed, diabetes can result in a variety of complications, including : heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, eye disease, erectile dysfunction (impotence), and nerve damage. Good diabetes management can help prevent or delay these complications.

Post Archives

 

Keyword Tag Cloud

 

 

__________________________________________________________________________________